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Race and Anti-Racism

This guide provides a range of resources available for you to learn more about race, racism, justice, and the rule of law.

Introduction

Libraries maintain exhibits and collections consisting of important historical materials that pertain to race and the law. Use this page to view some of those exhibits and collections.

Law School Exhibits & Collections

Law and Struggle for Racial Justice: Selected Materials from the Riesenfeld Rare Books Center 

A collection of material related to the Black American struggle for equal rights through an examination of historical cases, legislation, and achievements of the Civil Rights movement. Maintained by the University of Minnesota Law Law Library's Riesenfeld Center.

Stanford Clearinghouse on Diversity, Equity & Inclusion Research 

Stanford Law School and the Robert Crown Law Library collects and indexes research related to diversity, equity, and inclusion through this project. Maintained by the Stanford Law School.

Black History at William & Mary Law 

This exhibit is an online iteration of the physical exhibit displayed at William & Mary Law School during Spring 2021. Photographs included. Maintained by William & Mary Law School.

First Black Law Students at University of North Carolina 

In March 1951, the University of North Carolina was integrated. Four Black men were admitted to the law school that summer. This exhibit contained oral histories of two of those men, Harvey Beech and Floyd B. McKissick Sr. Maintained by the University of North Carolina.

A History of Diversity at Boston University School of Law 

From its founding, Boston University School of Law offered legal education to all students. In 1877, Takeo Kikuchi became the first Japaese graduate of BU Law and Emanuel Hewlett became the first Black BU Law graduate. This source is a timeline of the diversity at BU Law. Contains photographs. Maintained by Boston University School of Law.

National Museum of African American History & Culture Exhibits

National Museum of African American History and Culture's Searchable Museum 

The National Museum of African American History & Culture is a searchable museum designed as a place to explore history and culture through an African American lens. View online exhibits rich with multimedia content. Listed below are example of its relevant collections. 

Reconstructing Citizenship 

This online exhibit compiles descriptions, documents, and photographs to depict the journey of Black people fighting for citizenship through the ratification of the 14th Amendment. Maintained by the National Museum of African American History & Culture.

Seeing Black Women in Power 

This exhibit commemorates Black women in the 1960s and 1970s and their fight for equality and civil rights through photography and art. It includes materials about Kathleen Cleaver, an activist and professor of law at Emory University. Maintained by the National Museum of African American History & Culture.

Making a Way Out of No Way 

This physical exhibit can be seen at the National Museum of African American History & Culture. It commemorates the actions taken to change and build the lives of African Americans. Some material focuses on the legal battles activists fought in the pursuit of civil rights.
Pauli Murray's Proud Shoes 

Pauli Murray's Proud Shoes 

This online exhibit honors Pauli Murray the first African American to earn a J.S.D. from Yale Law School. Includes photographs, descriptions, and personal writings. Maintained by the National Museum of African American History & Culture.

Library of Congress Collections

The Civil Rights Act of 1964: A Long Struggle of Freedom 

An exhibit to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Maintained by the Library of Congress.

"With an Even Hand" Brown v. Board at Fifty 

This exhibit commemorates the 50th anniversary of the May 17, 1954 Supreme Court decision in Brown v. Board of Education. Maintained by the Library of Congress.

Slaves and the Courts, 1740 to 1860 

A collection of documents from trials, cases, proceedings, and other works pertaining slavery and the law. Notably, the collection includes materials from the Dred Scott case. Most materials are available online as images and searchable text. Maintained by the Library of Congress.