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Shelby Corzine (1793-1839)

Missing portrait
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Associate Justice, Supreme Court of the Republic of Texas, 1836-1839

Shelby Corzine was born August 14, 1793; his birthplace is uncertain, but is believed to be either North Carolina or Tennessee. He fought in the Creek War under Andrew Jackson and in 1814 was wounded in the Battle of Horseshoe Bend, a bloody battle that resulted in the deaths of some 800 Creek Indians and the acquisition of some twenty-three million acres of Creek land by the U.S. (half of the present state of Alabama and part of southern Georgia). Sam Houston was also injured in the battle.

Corzine arrived in Texas via Alabama around 1835, settling in San Augustine County. The following year he was elected a senator to the First Congress of the Republic of Texas but resigned shortly thereafter when he was appointed judge of the First Judicial District. The appointment automatically made him an associate justice of the first supreme court of the Republic. He also served on the commission to form the boundary between Texas and the United States. Corzine presided over San Augustine County's only treason trial following the Cordova Rebellion of 1838, in which Cherokee Indians conspired with Mexicans against Texas to thwart Texan encroachment on land to which they sought title.

Shelby Corzine was married with at least seven children. He died February 7, 1839 in San Augustine, where he was buried.

Sources

Ericson, Joe E. Judges of the Republic of Texas (1836-1846) 76 (Dallas, Texas: Taylor Publishing Co., 1980).

Miller, Edd. Corzine, Shelby, Handbook of Texas Online (last updated June 6, 2001).
http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/CC/fco75.html

Extended bibliography

Ericson, Joe E. Judges of the Republic of Texas (1836-1846) 76 (Dallas, Texas: Taylor Publishing Co., 1980).